Gujarat engineering admissions round one: 40% seats allotted, 54% may go vacant

Related News DU admissions 2019: Why is number of registrations falling at Delhi University? Career options for those who are good in Maths Maharashtra govt to deploy flying squads after Oppn claims colleges with minority tag selling seats With the implementation of 10 per cent Economically Weaker Section (EWS) quota, the number of seats increased by 14.46 per cent. In 2018, 63,846 seats were available, out of which only 30,591 students joined filling 48 per cent of the seats. (Representational Image) (Written by Suresh Chaudhary) Advertising After the allotment of seats in the first round of admissions declared by the Admission Committee for Professional Courses (ACPC) on Wednesday, 40 per cent of the total 73,084 engineering seats in 138 engineering colleges across the state were allotted. The allotment of just 29,753 seats could be a reason of concern for the authorities but what is more alarming is the fact that for 73,084 seats, the authorities received only 33,828 applications this year, indicating that more than 54 per cent seats may go vacant. Out of the applicants, 33,271 students made it to the merit list declared earlier by the ACPC. With the implementation of 10 per cent Economically Weaker Section (EWS) quota, the number of seats increased by 14.46 per cent. In 2018, 63,846 seats were available, out of which only 30,591 students joined filling 48 per cent of the seats. After the first round, 17 colleges — five of which are government, four grant in aid and six private — had their seats filled while no seats were taken in three colleges. In Aurum institute of Technology in Rajkot, Gujarat Institute of Technical Studies in Prantij and Shri Pandit Nathulalaji Vyas technical campus in Wadhwan, no seat was allotted against their strength of 393, 214 and 284 respectively. Advertising In 34 other colleges, the allotment was less than 10 per cent of their total seats. In another 18 colleges, seats allotted were less than 10 each. The reasons cited for the poor response has been attributed to declining standards of teaching and the implementation of 10 per cent of EWS seats for the increase in vacant seats. Sudhir Jain, director of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Gandhinagar, said, “The mushrooming of colleges in the state and deterioration of the standards of teaching have resulted in many seats remaining vacant. The competition is increasing every year but only for good institutes with limited seats.” Nimish Das, assistant professor at LJ Institute of Engineering and Technology, Ahmedabad, said, “Most of the students who study Maths in higher secondary aims to get into engineering but if they don’t get into a good college, they change their preference and enroll for courses in pure sciences rather than joining a below-average engineering college.” “The EWS quota will help more students in getting into top colleges but at the same time it will create more number of vacant seats in the average colleges,” an ACPC official said on condition of anonymity. Best Of Express Let's speak out in favour of religious freedom: Pompeo on his India visit Centre counters J&K governor on Pulwama attack, denies intel failure World Cup 2019: Azam, Sohail put Pakistan ahead in run chase Harsh Kumar, a student from Navsari who scored 78 percentage in his Class XII and has a score of 95 out of 120 in GUJCET, said, “With the help of the EWS certificate, my scope of getting into the top five colleges has increased as the number of seats has gone up.” In Madhuben and Bhanubhai Patel Institute of Engineering, affiliated to the Gujarat Technological University (GTU) in Anand, which was an exclusive college for girls had 179 vacant seats in 2018 against their total allotted strength of 300. But after it was decided to make it a co-educational institute from this academic session, all seats were filled after the first round of allotment. When asked how the situation can be improved, GP Vadodara, member secretary of ACPC, said, “Colleges need to help students in improving their soft skills and teaching should be based on what is expected from students in the field. Also, colleges should collaborate with the industry so that students can get real time experience and this will help them later in their placements.” Despite the doldrums in various engineering colleges, the Vidush Somany Institute of Technology and Research, affiliated to the Kadi Sarva Vishwavidhyalaya in Gandhinagar, has got approval for admission to 300 seats in five different branches of engineer

Gujarat engineering admissions round one: 40% seats allotted, 54% may go vacant
college admissions, engineering, engineering admissions, gujarat college admissions, gujarat engineering colleges, gujarat engineering admissions, education news, indian express news
With the implementation of 10 per cent Economically Weaker Section (EWS) quota, the number of seats increased by 14.46 per cent. In 2018, 63,846 seats were available, out of which only 30,591 students joined filling 48 per cent of the seats. (Representational Image)

(Written by Suresh Chaudhary)

After the allotment of seats in the first round of admissions declared by the Admission Committee for Professional Courses (ACPC) on Wednesday, 40 per cent of the total 73,084 engineering seats in 138 engineering colleges across the state were allotted.

The allotment of just 29,753 seats could be a reason of concern for the authorities but what is more alarming is the fact that for 73,084 seats, the authorities received only 33,828 applications this year, indicating that more than 54 per cent seats may go vacant. Out of the applicants, 33,271 students made it to the merit list declared earlier by the ACPC. With the implementation of 10 per cent Economically Weaker Section (EWS) quota, the number of seats increased by 14.46 per cent. In 2018, 63,846 seats were available, out of which only 30,591 students joined filling 48 per cent of the seats.

After the first round, 17 colleges — five of which are government, four grant in aid and six private — had their seats filled while no seats were taken in three colleges. In Aurum institute of Technology in Rajkot, Gujarat Institute of Technical Studies in Prantij and Shri Pandit Nathulalaji Vyas technical campus in Wadhwan, no seat was allotted against their strength of 393, 214 and 284 respectively.

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In 34 other colleges, the allotment was less than 10 per cent of their total seats. In another 18 colleges, seats allotted were less than 10 each. The reasons cited for the poor response has been attributed to declining standards of teaching and the implementation of 10 per cent of EWS seats for the increase in vacant seats.

Sudhir Jain, director of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Gandhinagar, said, “The mushrooming of colleges in the state and deterioration of the standards of teaching have resulted in many seats remaining vacant. The competition is increasing every year but only for good institutes with limited seats.”

Nimish Das, assistant professor at LJ Institute of Engineering and Technology, Ahmedabad, said, “Most of the students who study Maths in higher secondary aims to get into engineering but if they don’t get into a good college, they change their preference and enroll for courses in pure sciences rather than joining a below-average engineering college.”

“The EWS quota will help more students in getting into top colleges but at the same time it will create more number of vacant seats in the average colleges,” an ACPC official said on condition of anonymity.

Harsh Kumar, a student from Navsari who scored 78 percentage in his Class XII and has a score of 95 out of 120 in GUJCET, said, “With the help of the EWS certificate, my scope of getting into the top five colleges has increased as the number of seats has gone up.”

In Madhuben and Bhanubhai Patel Institute of Engineering, affiliated to the Gujarat Technological University (GTU) in Anand, which was an exclusive college for girls had 179 vacant seats in 2018 against their total allotted strength of 300. But after it was decided to make it a co-educational institute from this academic session, all seats were filled after the first round of allotment.

When asked how the situation can be improved, GP Vadodara, member secretary of ACPC, said, “Colleges need to help students in improving their soft skills and teaching should be based on what is expected from students in the field. Also, colleges should collaborate with the industry so that students can get real time experience and this will help them later in their placements.”

Despite the doldrums in various engineering colleges, the Vidush Somany Institute of Technology and Research, affiliated to the Kadi Sarva Vishwavidhyalaya in Gandhinagar, has got approval for admission to 300 seats in five different branches of engineering with additional 55 seats for the EWS quota, officials of the ACPC told The Indian Express.

However, it was able to get only 30 students in the first round, with 325 seats remaining vacant. Colleges and ACPC authorities are hoping the situation would improve after the second round of admissions on July 4.

(Suresh Chaudhary is an intern with The Indian Express)

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